Chedd-Angier
Home Projects About Us Contact

saving the ocean
Like us on Facebook    Follow us on Twitter    Watch us on Netflix    Watch us on you tube

Episode 7: Trinidad's Turtle Giants    Premiered on PBS January 3 2013    Watch on PBS

Earth’s last warm-blooded monster reptile, the skin-covered, 1000-pound, leatherback turtle – the closest thing we have to a living dinosaur – is thriving on Caribbean beaches. Carl Safina travels to Trinidad to witness first-hand the spectacular return of these ancient animals. As recently as the 1970s, Trinidad’s leatherbacks were heading for extinction, killed on their nesting beaches for food, their egg dug up, and –most gruesomely – shot for shark bait so the sharks could in turn be shot. Read More>>

Trinidad1
Female leatherback digging a nest on Matura Beach, Trinidad
Trinidad1
She lays about 85 eggs per nest and about 4-5 nests in one season
Trinidad1
Carl with Dr. Scott Eckert, Director of Science for WIDECAST, Wider Caribbean Sea Turtle Conservation Network
Trinidad1
Leatherbacks are the largest sea turtles in the world, weighing up to 2000 lb
Trinidad1
Hatchlings emerge at sunset or night when the sand is cooler, allowing them to evade beach predators
Trinidad1
Only one in a thousand hatchlings will make it to adulthood
Trinidad1
Hopefully, some of these hatchlings will return to nest in about 35 years
Trinidad1
Underwater cameraperson Valentina Cucchiara gears up for the rough waters off Trinidad’s north coast
Trinidad1
The crew searches for elusive leatherback turtles at sea
Trinidad1
Gillnets entangle more than 4000 leatherbacks a year in Trinidad alone. One in three survive
Trinidad1
Beach erosion exposes leatherback eggs to predators like vultures and dogs
Trinidad1
Carl with Suzan Lakhan Baptiste, founder of the turtle conservation group--Nature Seekers
Trinidad1
The hardworking team. From left to right- soundman Tim Wessel, cameraman Dan Lyons, underwater cameraperson Valentina Cucchiara, host Carl Safina and director Dave Huntley